our blog

Comments: Comments are off

Catergories: Uncategorized

By: mmatty

S.B. 179: Advancing Ohio to Forefront of Water Recycling Innovation

LEGISLATION THAT MODIFIES THE WAY OHIO MANAGES PRIVATE WATER SYSTEMS COULD POSITION THE STATE AS A NATIONAL LEADER IN WATER RECYCLING INNOVATION.

Gov. John Kasich signed Ohio Senate Bill (S.B.) 179 on April 10th, 2014, changing the Revised Code that addresses water systems with fewer than 15 connections serving fewer than 25 people. The law empowers Ohio’s Department of Health to set and enforce regulations for private water systems using “well, spring, cistern, pond or hauled water”—and S.B. 179 added “recycled” to this list.

This critical addition of “recycled” opens the door for developing technology: closed-loop water systems that can divert wastewater from overburdened sewer systems by cleaning it and returning it for re-use in the same home or building. The concept is called watercycling, and it’s an innovative approach to dealing with a critical world problem: access to clean, safe water and disposal of used water (wastewater).

The immediate impact of S.B. 179 is the welcoming of closed-loop watercycling for residential and commercial properties in Ohio.

“This places the State of Ohio right in the middle of a budding high-tech industry,” says Sen. John Eklund, who introduced S.B. 179 and assembled bipartisan support to pass the bill. “Wouldn’t it be wonderful if Ohio became the production center for this technology?”

Sen. Eklund added that he was pleased to advocate for an innovation that addresses a looming worldwide crisis: access to fresh water. “Think about Arizona and New Mexico and California,” which are experiencing historic droughts, said Eklund. “Think about all the parts of the world that God left dry and thirsty.”

Essentially, S.B. 179 is an exercise in innovative inclusion. It recognizes that advancing water technologies could solve critical problems and makes necessary legislative revisions to allow for progressive entrepreneurs to introduce solutions.

Rep. Anielski affirms S.B. 179’s role in making Ohio a leader in water technologies. “The legislation will allow for the development and utilization of state-of-the-art water recycling technology without compromising our public safety and health,” she says.

S.B. 179 is a proactive first step toward a larger mindset shift that will be required as more and more water scarcity issues arise. These issues must be tackled in advance with engineered solutions that respect the beauty and purpose of water in sustainable, beneficial ways. Tangent Company has developed an innovative watercycling system that addresses these concerns.

“As technology continually evolves, we must make sure that our state’s regulations do not hinder engineering advancement,” says State Rep. Marlene Anielski, who shepherded Eklund’s bill through the House.

Please follow and like us:
error0

Comments are currently closed.